Thursday, October 30, 2014

Top 20 Scariest Things People Say to Writers

by Edie Melson @EdieMelson

In honor of Halloween I thought I’d dust off this old post and share it again. It truly is scary what people will say to writers without thinking! 

I’ve also added my rebuttals to these thoughtless observations, and I’m happy to report that I’ve yet to give into the temptation to utter them aloud, no matter how badly I wanted to.

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Take Time to Retreat, Relax and Rekindle

by Edie Melson @EdieMelson

This sign greeted us at the front door of the house we stayed
in for the Guideposts retreat at the Wainwright House property.
As I mentioned briefly on Monday, last week I was given an incredible gift. I was one of eleven women who won the 2014 TELL US YOUR STORY Guideposts contest. The prize? Spending an entire week at the Wainwright House with Guideposts editors and writers honing our craft.

Even though I got home late Friday night, it’s going to take me a while to process this amazing experience. So expect some future blog posts about what I’ve learned here.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Indie Tuesday—Crafting the Perfect First Line

by: Jessica Keller @AuthorKeller

Have you ever shaken hands with someone only for them to offer a cold, limp, awkward greeting? A book with a week first line leaves a reader with the same feeling. Avoid that at all costs.

In fiction, the first line has to pull the reader in. Make them wonder or grip them enough to walk to the register and by the book. Grabbing them doesn’t have to mean giving your reader a total shock because that doesn’t fit the tone of many books, but it must make a reader want more. Spark enough curiosity to continue.

Monday, October 27, 2014

Social Media Monday—7 Situations When Sharing a Live Social Media Update is the WRONG Choice to Make

by Edie Melson @EdieMelson


No, I haven’t actually changed my mind about the value of social media.

Yes, you read the title of this blog post correctly. The queen of social media is suggesting that more is NOT always better.

What I am suggesting is that we need to show a little balance. There are times to connect online and there are equally important times to live in the moment—without worrying about how to make your experience into a tweet or Facebook update.

Today I want to share some specific instances when you should put down your smart phone and just experience life.

Sunday, October 26, 2014

Weekend Worship—The Faith of a Headless Horseman

The heart is more deceitful than anything else, 
and incurable—who can understand it? Jeremiah 17:9

Evidence of Fall is everywhere we look.
Now that fall is fully upon us, everywhere we look evidence of the season jumps out at us. The trees have donned their colorful best and pumpkins are sprouting grins on every front porch. Halloween candy is littering the aisles at grocery store and kiddos are planning costumes. Along with this, some classics have also come back to haunt us—from It’s the Great Pumpkin Charlie Brown to The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.

It’s that classic book by Washington Irving which has caught my mind’s eye this year—or more specifically a character within the book. As I was watching a rerun of Disney’s version, I was struck by how I resemble the Headless Horseman when it comes to faith. 

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Forever is Composed of Nows—A Social Media Image to Share



Forever is composed of nows. - Emily Dickinson


Share your thoughts in the comment section below.

I also invite you to use this image any way you like online. Post it to your blog, share it on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, anywhere you'd like. All I ask is that you keep it intact, with my website watermark visible.

Don't forget to join the conversation!
Blessings,
Edie

Friday, October 24, 2014

The Editor’s Desk—A No-nonsense Approach to Non-Fiction

by Lori Hatcher @LoriHatcher2

Repeat after me:

“Editors are my friends. They are not enemies determined to ruin my devotion, article, or novel. Their job is to make me and my work the best we can possibly be. Editors are my friends.”

Now we can move forward on the premise that because editors are our friends, we would never, ever, ever want to drive them crazy. A crazy editor is not our friend.

Last month I shared two things that drive editors crazy. This month, in case you’re considering career suicide, I’ll share a few more. If you’re a smart writer, you’ll avoid these pitfalls and be well on your way to making your editor smile.